This is Where …

Jul 27, 2016 | Court Practices, Stuff you may not know

. . .I came in.

There’s a phrase that’s fast dying out. Oh, a few people still say it, usually when they get stuck listening to a repetitive argument – you know, a roll of the eyes as the speaker comes back to the same point yet again, then, “This is where I came in, I’m outta here.”

Easy to envision, we’re in the middle of a Presidential Election cycle.

Most people, though, don’t know what the origin of the phrase is. And, there’s no reason they should, it gets increasingly more archaic every day. It’s from the days when movie theaters ran features on a continuous loop. Walk in for a 4:15 show at 5:00, watch the last 45 minutes or so, then stay as the movie starts again. Bang, right back into it, you stay until you’re caught up, you leave … where you came in.

This was such a thing that some movies – Psycho, in particular – used it as a marketing tool. “Absolutely No One Admitted After The Start!”

Today, there are so many ads and trailers before every movie that I, at least, need to be reminded what film I’m there to see by the time the theater finally goes dark. Even without all that, in this day of Spoiler Alert, it would never work without some form of violence.

Also – can you imagine seeing Pulp Fiction this way? Impossible to follow, I’m willing to bet.

Which – you had to know this was coming – is exactly what showing up in court after the case starts is: close to impossible to catch up. If they still let you in, because a lot of court actions come with the Alfred Hitchcock admonition, “No one … but no one” can participate after certain court proceedings start.

In court particularly foreclosure proceedings, we have to show up on time, sit through the ads and the coming attractions and go step by step, on time, from there. There’s little to no room for ‘coming in’ at any other time.

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I’ll talk to anyone who is currently behind on their mortgage, thinks they may not be able to afford their mortgage in the coming months, or is already in foreclosure. The earlier we talk, the more options you have.

… Sarah Poriss.

Sarah Poriss, Attorney at Law, LLC is the largest woman-owned foreclosure defense law firm in Connecticut, providing homeowners with quality legal counsel in foreclosure mediation and foreclosure defense.

Working at Consumer Law Group in Rocky Hill, Connecticut for four years, Sarah specialized in representing consumers facing financial crises like debt collection harassment and identity theft. Upon opening her own office, she expanded her focus to defending consumers sued by credit card companies and representing homeowners in foreclosure.

Sarah has elevated her practice by exclusively representing clients with money issues. She played a crucial role in drafting foreclosure mediation rules as a member of Connecticut’s Bench-Bar Foreclosure Committee for seven years.

Additionally, she contributed to the Bench-Bar Small Claims Committee to enhance clarity in small claims proceedings and ensure debt collectors provide substantial evidence to win cases.

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